facebook youtube pinterest

Abstract thinking

Group show

13 May, 2016

In Western art at least, abstract painting has been around since the first decade of the 20th century. The path of reduction, where unnecessary information is gradually removed from an image for a variety of reasons, is a well-travelled one. Kandinsky, Malevich, the Cubists and the Fauves eschewed description for expressive or analytical purposes and changed art forever. Influenced by non-European art (Africa, Japan), an appreciation of the essential mark grew, of art that was a distillation of experience , leaving the unique hand of the artist on the work.

Symbolism was another path to abstraction, where early practitioner Gustave Moreau identified a natural progression away from recognisable objects to an idea. Paul Klee embraced the simplicity of children’s art with his decorative and magical mythmaking that introduced a new way of seeing. On the whole though, these artists (not Malevich) remained anchored in the visual world. They took their inspiration from the world and vestiges of that world remained in the paintings and sculptures they made.

Rotate

Rotate

Betty Nolan,Mixed Media on Hahnmuelle paper, 74h x 98 cm, framed

View in shop »
Spume

Spume

Betty Nolan,Mixed Media on Hahnmuelle paper, 74h x 98 cm, framed

View in shop »
Red Sheoak Forest

Red Sheoak Forest

Betty Nolan, Acrylic on canvas, 166 x 71 cm

View in shop »
Yellow Rosny Forest

Yellow Rosny Forest

Betty Nolan, Acrylic on Canvas, 102 x 204 cm

View in shop »
Chang Moon (window and door)

Chang Moon (window and door)

Eun Ju Cho, Silkscreen and linoprint, 42 x 56 cm, framed, edition of 10

Jetty

Jetty

Digital print on Acrylic, 80 x 80 cm or 60 x 60 cm, Edition of 10 each

View in shop »
Ferry Interior

Ferry Interior

Digital print on Acrylic, 80 x 80 cm or 60 x 60cm, Edition of 10 each

View in shop »
Involved No 19

Involved No 19

Pierre Cavalan, Metal Assemblage, 52 x 40 cm, framed